Capital Project Funding the Focus of Native Hawaiian Policy Center

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

January 29, 2011

Honolulu, Hawaii – The Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement (CNHA) and its Native Hawaiian Policy Center is surveying its over 100 member organizations to identify capital improvement projects of $2 million or less that are in need of funding.  A solicitation was sent out by CNHA president, Robin Puanani Danner, requesting members to share information about capital improvement projects they are working on or planning for.

“Our experience working with small community projects around the state indicates that community organizations and homestead associations have terrific projects,” Danner said.  “Most might think that the gap between bringing them to fruition is funding, but what we have found is that it’s actually knowledge about where potential funding is located, especially on projects at less than $2 million in cost estimates.”

For the last 10 years, CNHA has delivered capacity building services, which includes grant training forums to help its member organizations identify, apply for and win grant funds.  Since then, CNHA has launched a community loan fund to focus on access to capital in Hawaiian communities, by families and organizations, which in less than a year, has delivered nearly a million in funding toward solar energy improvements, another million toward construction of homes, and just over $6 million in capital improvement funds to nonprofit organizations.  The loan fund can also originate community facility loans to charter schools, health clinics and nonprofits for a variety of capital improvements and equipment purchases.

“What we know on projects that are in the $10,000 to $2 million dollar range, is that they can benefit from a multi-funding approach, versus just looking at grant funds, or just looking at loan capital or tax credits,” said Lilia Kapuniai, CNHA Vice President and Community Services Manager.  “We have organized our products and services around what the reality is on the ground in our communities, and can now help provide information on grant sources, but also loan capital, tax credits and other funding vehicles.”

The Small CIP survey is available to be completed by CNHA members all year round, which will be reviewed and distributed to potential funders that fit the project description to begin exploration of how to access existing and available funding sources that are out there.  “Completing the survey doesn’t guarantee funding,” Kapuniai said.  “but what it does is widen the field of sources that become aware of the project and can contemplate whether it fits with their funding source.  That is our goal, and taking 30 minutes to complete the survey is a great way to expand who knows about your project and helping to connect funders with community project ideas.”

To obtain a copy of the CNHA Small CIP Survey, email policy@hawaiiancouncil.org or call Lilia Kapuniai, CNHA Vice President at 808.596.8155.

CNHA is a national network of Native Hawaiian Organizations, providing assistance in accessing capital and technical resources, and is a policy voice on issues important to Native Hawaiian communities. Its mission is to enhance the well-being of Hawaii through the cultural, economic, and community development of Native Hawaiians.  For more information about CNHA please contact us at 808.596.8155, toll-free at 1.800.709.2642, by e-mail at info@hawaiiancouncil.org, or visit our website at www.hawaiiancouncil.org.

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Media Contact:

TiLeaf Group

A Native Advocacy Firm

P: 808.529.4610

F: 808.356.3423

E: info@tileafgroup.com

Capital Project Funding the Focus of Native Hawaiian Policy Center

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

January 29, 2011

Honolulu, Hawaii – The Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement (CNHA) and its Native Hawaiian Policy Center is surveying its over 100 member organizations to identify capital improvement projects of $2 million or less that are in need of funding.  A solicitation was sent out by CNHA president, Robin Puanani Danner, requesting members to share information about capital improvement projects they are working on or planning for.

“Our experience working with small community projects around the state indicates that community organizations and homestead associations have terrific projects,” Danner said.  “Most might think that the gap between bringing them to fruition is funding, but what we have found is that it’s actually knowledge about where potential funding is located, especially on projects at less than $2 million in cost estimates.”

For the last 10 years, CNHA has delivered capacity building services, which includes grant training forums to help its member organizations identify, apply for and win grant funds.  Since then, CNHA has launched a community loan fund to focus on access to capital in Hawaiian communities, by families and organizations, which in less than a year, has delivered nearly a million in funding toward solar energy improvements, another million toward construction of homes, and just over $6 million in capital improvement funds to nonprofit organizations.  The loan fund can also originate community facility loans to charter schools, health clinics and nonprofits for a variety of capital improvements and equipment purchases.

“What we know on projects that are in the $10,000 to $2 million dollar range, is that they can benefit from a multi-funding approach, versus just looking at grant funds, or just looking at loan capital or tax credits,” said Lilia Kapuniai, CNHA Vice President and Community Services Manager.  “We have organized our products and services around what the reality is on the ground in our communities, and can now help provide information on grant sources, but also loan capital, tax credits and other funding vehicles.”

The Small CIP survey is available to be completed by CNHA members all year round, which will be reviewed and distributed to potential funders that fit the project description to begin exploration of how to access existing and available funding sources that are out there.  “Completing the survey doesn’t guarantee funding,” Kapuniai said.  “but what it does is widen the field of sources that become aware of the project and can contemplate whether it fits with their funding source.  That is our goal, and taking 30 minutes to complete the survey is a great way to expand who knows about your project and helping to connect funders with community project ideas.”

To obtain a copy of the CNHA Small CIP Survey, email policy@hawaiiancouncil.org or call Lilia Kapuniai, CNHA Vice President at 808.596.8155.

CNHA is a national network of Native Hawaiian Organizations, providing assistance in accessing capital and technical resources, and is a policy voice on issues important to Native Hawaiian communities. Its mission is to enhance the well-being of Hawaii through the cultural, economic, and community development of Native Hawaiians.  For more information about CNHA please contact us at 808.596.8155, toll-free at 1.800.709.2642, by e-mail at info@hawaiiancouncil.org, or visit our website at www.hawaiiancouncil.org.

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Media Contact:

TiLeaf Group

A Native Advocacy Firm

P: 808.529.4610

F: 808.356.3423

E: info@tileafgroup.com

Native Hawaiian Council Elects Parker to Chairmanship

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

January 28, 2011

Honolulu, Hawaii – The Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement (CNHA) founded in 2001 to enhance the cultural, economic and community development of Native Hawaiians, held its first Council Meeting of the 2011 year, with action items of appointing Officers and Chairmanship of the 18-member board.  By unanimous consent, Alvin Parker, a native Hawaiian Public Charter School leader, was elected to another term as the CNHA Chairman.   Vice-chairman, treasurer and secretary were also confirmed via unanimous consent, William Ornellas, a native Hawaiian attorney, Michelle Kauhane, a homestead leader, and Li Garcia-Ballard, a native Hawaiian business leader were elected respectively.

CNHA board members serving terms also include the following, elected by voting members of CNHA:

Aimoku McClellan – Pacific Center for Economic Development

Leinā‘ala Kalama Heine, Pi‘ilani Hanohano – Hālau Nā Pualei O Likolehua

Philip Kahue, Curtney Tagupa – Alaka‘ina Foundation

Maile Meyer – Native Books / Nā Mea Hawaii

Kelly Lincoln – Panaewa Homestead Association

Akoni Akana, Shirly Ann Kahai – Friends of Moku‘ula

Mel Soong, Bob Moore, Eddie Lee – I Mua Group

Andrew Ah Po, Jan Allianic – Kanaka Maoli O Kaleponi, Inc.

Michael Naho‘opi‘i, Carol-Marie Kanohi Lee – Kaho‘olawe Island Reseve Commission

Lance Holden, Annelle Amaral – ‘Aha Hui Siwila Hawai‘i O Kapolei

Keoni Jensen, Tee Furtado, Darlene Butts – Mainland Council Associaton of Hawaiian Civic Clubs

Harold Johnston, Puni Kekauoha – Papakolea Community Development Corporation

Trustee Bob Lyndsey, Kama Hopkins – Individual Member (OHA)

Judge Bill Fernandez – Native Hawaiian Political Action Committee

Corporate officer appointments for full time leadership were also taken action on, with Robin Puanani Danner, the Chief Executive Officer appointed for another term as the Council President, Napali Woode, the Chief Financial Officer appointed as Senior Vice President and Lilia Kapuniai, the Community Services Manager appointed as Vice President.  All three executives have provided consistent leadership as a team for several years.

Vice presidents approved by the board that provide probono assistance to the Council include Jade Danner, CEO of a small business technology firm and Noe Kalipi, CEO of a native advocacy firm.

The CNHA governing board convenes four times a year, and conducts an annual members meeting at the Annual Native Hawaiian Convention.  For more information, visit www.hawaiiancouncil.org or call 808.596.8155.

CNHA is a national network of Native Hawaiian Organizations, providing assistance in accessing capital and technical resources, and is a policy voice on issues important to Native Hawaiian communities. Its mission is to enhance the well-being of Hawaii through the cultural, economic, and community development of Native Hawaiians.  For more information about CNHA please contact us at 808.596.8155, toll-free at 1.800.709.2642, by e-mail at info@hawaiiancouncil.org, or visit our website at www.hawaiiancouncil.org.

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Media Contact:

TiLeaf Group

A Native Advocacy Firm

P: 808.529.4610

F: 808.356.3423

E: info@tileafgroup.com

Locally-Owned Solar Company Donates to Hawaiian Way Fund

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

January 26, 2011

Honolulu, Hawaii – Poncho’s Solar Service, a Native Hawaiian-owned small business has presented a check for $10,000 to the Hawaiian Way Fund, to continue its support of cultural and community practitioners. Operated by the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement (CNHA), the Hawaiian Way Fund unifies donations and gifts by individuals and companies to support cultural and community-based programs.

“We are grateful to the good people at Poncho’s Solar Service for this fantastic commitment of philanthropy,” said Robin Puanani Danner, CNHA President and CEO. “The donations made to the Hawaiian Way Fund are a powerful investment in Hawaii – we aren’t just sun and sand. The best of our state embodies the past, the present and the future of who we all are as a people and as a community – culture and language, and how we strive to help others is very much a part of Hawaii’s identity.”

Based in Honolulu, Poncho’s Solar Service was founded in 1988 by Corpuz “Poncho” Safranca, a Native Hawaiian from the island of Maui. Poncho’s provides residential and commercial solar water heating, and photovoltaic systems on Kauai, Oahu, Maui, and Hawaii island.

“No question that Poncho’s Solar is truly a great example of great corporate citizenship” Danner remarked. “He is of Hawaii, and it’s just great to see this kind of sharing with the Hawaiian Way Fund, a highly effective philanthropic fund dedicated to cultural and community initiatives.”

The Hawaiian Way Fund is the donor program of CNHA. The Fund has one charitable purpose – to enhance the well-being of Hawaii through community-based initiatives founded on Hawaiian culture, knowledge and traditions. For more information, visit www.hawaiianwayfund.org.

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Media Contact:

TiLeaf Group

A Native Advocacy Firm

P: 808.529.4610

F: 808.356.3423

E: info@tileafgroup.com

Hawaiian Policy Center Launches Litigation Awareness Project

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

January 27, 2011

Honolulu, Hawaii – The Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement (CNHA) and its Policy Center have adopted a project to increase understanding on a variety of legal cases moving through the court system involving Native Hawaiian trust assets.  The Policy Center Litigation Awareness Project will convene Hawaiian leaders statewide three times a year, to receive briefings on cases, including information on plaintiffs, defendants and the core tenets of each case.

“There are a number of court cases that are powerfully important to Native Hawaiian communities, and most certainly our trust assets,” said Robin Puanani Danner, CNHA President.  “Rather than read about them sporadically in the newspaper, we decided that more directly involving and informing our members and communities on the basics of some of these court cases is the best approach.”

The Policy Center will convene on the court cases at the end of January, in May and in September for the 2011 calendar year.  The first case to be reviewed in substance is the Nelson case, filed by beneficiaries to ensure that the Hawaiian Home Land trust is adequately funded by state government as provided by in the state of Hawaii constitution.  The Lingle administration vehemently fought the premise of the case.

“I’m really looking forward to reviewing the Nelson case and becoming more aware of where it has been over the last several years, and where it is today,” Danner continued.  “I’m a big proponent of litigation being a last resort approach to settling differences, and frankly, as Native Hawaiian leaders, we have been remiss in raising the awareness of this case.  We should never, ever, let state agencies, in this case the Lingle attorney general’s office, be the sole voice on the potential solutions or results of these kinds of cases.  We have a responsibility as leaders of our communities, to educate ourselves and to be knowledgeable of what these cases mean, and what arguments are being made for or against our trust assets.”

The Policy Center Litigation Awareness Project will not only host the three annual briefings for its leadership, but will also coordinate publication of summaries and updates on the status of court cases it includes, to the larger membership of CNHA and partner organizations.

For more information about the CNHA Policy Center, the Litigation Awareness Project or any program of CNHA, contact policy@hawaiiancouncil.org.

CNHA is a national network of Native Hawaiian Organizations, providing assistance in accessing capital and technical resources, and is a policy voice on issues important to Native Hawaiian communities. Its mission is to enhance the well-being of Hawaii through the cultural, economic, and community development of Native Hawaiians.  For more information about CNHA please contact us at 808.596.8155, toll-free at 1.800.709.2642, by e-mail at info@hawaiiancouncil.org, or visit our website at www.hawaiiancouncil.org.

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Media Contact:

TiLeaf Group

A Native Advocacy Firm

P: 808.529.4610

F: 808.356.3423

E: info@tileafgroup.com

Phone Scam Alert! Do not press 90# on your telephones

I dialed ‘0’ to check this out, and the operator confirmed that this was correct, so please pass it on.. (l also checked out snopes.com. This is true, and also applies to cell phones!)

PASS ON TO EVERYONE YOU KNOW

I received a telephone call last evening from an individual identifying himself as an AT&T  Service Technician (could also be Telus) who was conducting a test on the telephone  lines. He stated that to complete the test I should touch nine (9), zero (0), the pound sign (#), and then hang up. Luckily, I was suspicious and refused.

Upon contacting the telephone company, I was informed that by pushing 90#, you give the requesting individual full access to your telephone line, which enables them to place long distance calls billed to your home phone number.

I was further informed that this scam has been originating from many local jails/prisons. DO
NOT press 90# for ANYONE…

The GTE Security Department requested that I share this information with EVERYONE I KNOW.

After checking with Verizon they also said it was true, so do not dial 90# for anyone !!!!!

PLEASE HIT THAT FORWARD BUTTON AND PASS THIS ON TO EVERYONE YOU KNOW!!!

Abercrombie pitches new priorities and new taxes

By B.J. Reyes

POSTED: 10:35 a.m. HST, Jan 24, 2011

Recalling the “New Day” theme from his campaign, Gov. Neil Abercrombie promised to confront head-on the challenge of an $844 million budget deficit through a restructuring of government and proposals for new taxes.

“A new day for me begins, I hope, with an honest account of the state of our government,” Abercrombie said at the outset of his first State of the State address.

Getting choked up, Abercrombie spent the first five minutes of his speech reminiscing about his time in the Legislature, recognizing former colleagues such as Sens. Clayton Hee and Malama Solomon and former Gov. Ben Cayetano, with whom he also served in the House.

Contributed by Star Adviser and Staff B.J. Reyes. For more information about this article, click here to visit http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/Abercrombie_pitches_soda_tax_in_State_of_the_State_.html

Hanabusa seated on military and land panels

By Associated Press

POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Jan 24, 2011

U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa has been appointed to House committees that handle military and environmental policies.

Hanabusa, who just started her first term representing Hawaii’s 1st Congressional District, was named by fellow House Democrats to the Armed Services Committee and its readiness and oversight subcommittees.

A statement from her office said last week that she is the lone freshman Democrat to be named to the armed serv-ices panel.

Contributed by Associated Press.  For more information about this article visit

http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/20110124_Hanabusa_seated_on_military_and_land_panels.html

Governor Seeking Applicants to Boards and Commissions

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: January 19, 2011

Honolulu –  Governor Neil Abercrombie today announced that applications are being accepted for service on the numerous boards and commissions – including the Board of Education – via his website, http://hawaii.gov/gov.

The Office of the Governor oversees more than 150 boards and commissions established by the state constitution, statutes, or executive orders.  Members of the public may apply themselves or recommend qualified applicants.

“We want an open and fair process to identify public servants who are dedicated to advancing our vision of A New Day in Hawaii,” Governor Abercrombie said. “We cannot make positive change in Hawaii alone.  It takes many voices from diverse backgrounds to help build stronger communities.”

In November 2010, Hawaii voters passed a Constitutional Amendment for a Governor-appointed Board of Education (BOE).  This session, which begins today, lawmakers will be working on legislation to determine the BOE appointment process.  In preparation, the Abercrombie Administration is including the BOE among the other boards and commissions.

Information about all the boards and commissions, and application instructions are posted at http://hawaii.gov/gov/about/boards-commissions.html.

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For more information contact:

Donalyn Dela Cruz

Press Secretary

(808) 586-0012

HECO customers will receive 2.1 million of refunds in February

Customers will be receiving refunds in February from  Hawaiian Electric Co. who submitted a refund plan in the amount of $2.1 million after some minor adjustments were made to HECO  by the state Public Utilities Commission, according to a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.