Hawaiians for Neil

We’re looking for 1000+ Native Hawaiians to help elect Neil Abercrombie for Governor.

Your name will be listed in a print advertisement.  And can you kokua by donating $10 or more to the cause?  (An advertisement costs $14,000.)

PLEASE PRINT! (NOTE:  Occupation/Employer info required by Campaign Spending law)

1 Name

Email:

Address, City, Zip
Phone #

Occupation/Employer

Donation
2 Name

Email:

Address, City, Zip
Phone #

Occupation/Employer

Donation
3 Name

Email:

Address, City, Zip
Phone #

Occupation/Employer

Donation
4 Name

Email:

Address, City, Zip
Phone #

Occupation/Employer

Donation
5 Name

Email:

Address, City, Zip
Phone #

Occupation/Employer

Donation

Write checks to:  Abercrombie for Governor (memo:  “Hawaiians”), 1050 Ala Moana Blvd,

Suite 2150,Honolulu, HI 96814 or donate online at www.neilabercrombie.com/hawaiiansforneil

Paid for by Abercrombie for Governor, 1050 Ala Moana Blvd, Suite 2150, Honolulu, HI  96814

OHA helps Small Native Hawaiian serving organizations meet IRS compliance requirements by the Oct. 15 deadline!

Aloha mai kakou,

These workshops, sponsored by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, is to help small Native Hawaiian serving organizations who are in jeopardy of losing their tax-exempt status meet the IRS compliance requirements by the Oct. 15 deadline.  It is open to representatives of small Native Hawaiian serving organizations (including directors, staff, volunteers or members).  “Small organizations” are those that make less than $25,000 per year.  “Native Hawaiian serving organizations” are organizations that serve Native Hawaiian beneficiaries are part of their programs, projects or mission.  You will be asked to identify the Native Hawaiian community you serve or benefit during the workshop.

Participants are strongly encouraged to bring a laptop computer with wireless internet capability, your organization’s EIN and a working email address in order to complete the IRS filing at the workshop. If you do not have access to a laptop, please contact us beforehand at honua.consulting@gmail.com.

All workshop dates and locations:

Hawai`i Island (Waimea) 09/25 10:30a & 12:30p

Kanu o ka ‘Aina – Hālau Ho’olako (64-1043 Hiiaka St.)

O`ahu (Honolulu) 10/2 – 10a, 12p & 3p

UH – Manoa Richardson School of Law (2515 Dole St. – CR 2)

Maui (Wailuku) 10/4 – 1p & 5:30p

Maui Ecomomic Opportunity, Inc Family Center (99 Mahalani St.)

You can register for these workshops at:

http://www.eventbrite.com/org/573644599

For more information about the IRS filing requirments or to check to see if your organization may be in jeopardy of losing tax exempt status, please visit http://www.irs.gov/charities/article/0,,id=225705,00.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Kahi of Native Nations Education Foundation at (808) 554-6685.

Additional information will be provided at www.honuaconsulting.com starting September 20, 2010.

Thank you to our partners: Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Native Nations Education Foundation, Honua Consulting, Kanu o ka `Aina Learning `Ohana, Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu, Ka Huli Ao: Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law, Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commer, Hawai`i Maoli and Maui Economic Opportunities, Inc.

Please help spread the word and share this information with others.

Mahalo!


Trisha Kehaulani Watson, JD, PhD
President, Honua Consulting
PO Box 61395
Honolulu, Hawai`i 96839
kelepona (phone): (808) 392-1617
leka uila (email): watson@honuaconsulting.com
kahua punaewele (website): http://www.honuaconsulting.com

BENEFIT NATIVE AMERICAN-NATIVE HAWAIIAN BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT

HAWAIIAN WAY FUND’S ANNUAL

BENEFIT NATIVE AMERICAN-NATIVE HAWAIIAN BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT

What: The Hawaiian Way Fund is hosting its Annual Benefit Native American-Native Hawaiian Basketball Tournament.  All proceeds from the tournament will directly benefit the well-being of community-based organizations and initiatives founded on Hawaiian culture, knowledge and traditions.

Tournament Types: Men’s & Women’s 18 years or older teams, Double Elimination, 18 minute halves, 3 point contest, game MVPs.

Men and Women’s Teams: Indigenous or Spouse, 10 teams maximum with 12 player rosters.

Team Fee: $375 per team. Deadline to register and entry fee payment is due on September 15, 2010, or until all slots are full.

Cash Prizes: 1st Place-$2,500, 2nd Place-$1,500, 3rd Place-$1,000,  3 Point Contest-$500.

Where: Gym to be announced in Kaneohe or Waimanalo, Hawaii on Oahu

When: October 8-10, 2010 (Friday 5-10 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sunday 1-9 p.m.)

More Information: Contact Gigi, Tournament Coordinator, at 808-426-1500 or basketball@hawaiianwayfund.org.  Entry forms and complete information available at: http://www.hawaiiancouncil.org/index.php/news

Free Meeting Space for Community Organizations at the 9th Annual Native Hawaiian Convention

Free Meeting Space for Community Organizations at the 9th Annual Native Hawaiian Convention

What: Every year, CNHA coordinates free meeting space for Member Organizations during the week of the Annual Native Hawaiian Convention.  If your organization needs private meeting space to coordinate a board meeting or planning meeting, this is a great time to access fantastic meeting space with free parking.

Where: Hawaii Convention Center

When: Tuesday, October 12, 2010 from 3:45 pm to 5:15 pm

Thursday, October 14, 2010 from 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm

To reserve a meeting room for your organization, contact Napali Woode at CNHA at info@hawaiiancouncil.org or call 808.596.8155.

To Register for the 9th Annual Native Hawaiian Convention contact CNHA at 808.596.8155, toll-free at 1.800.709.2642, by e-mail at info@hawaiiancouncil.org,  or visit our website at www.hawaiiancouncil.org.

Practitioners in Fourth Season with Cultural Connections Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

September 28, 2010

NAWILIWILI, HI – The Hawaiian Way Fund, a unified donor initiative that supports cultural and community practitioners, started its fourth season administering the Cultural Connections Program in partnership with Princess Cruises.  Administered by the nonprofit, Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement (CNHA), Hawaiian Way Fund continues its work with cultural practitioners to provide interactive workshops in-port throughout the state.

“We completed six workshops and two shows in the past week with practitioners in Nawiliwili, Honolulu, Lahaina and Hilo,” said Rosalee Puaoi, CNHA Community Development Specialist.  “We expect to bring on additional practitioners as well as provide hula sessions in the Honolulu port during the 2010-2011 season.”

Since 2008, CNHA and the Hawaiian Way Fund, has coordinated over 80 workshops with 48 cultural practitioners and welcomes Jake Kaleo Kaohelaulii on Kauai presenting a workshop on wahi pana and cultural practices.  “Through contact with Kauai Museum, I was able to share my manao and stories in three workshops with passengers onboard the Regal Princess,” comments Kaleo Kaohelaulii.  “As a young man from Niihau, I am very glad I am able to participate in this unique program with CNHA.”

“We are ecstatic that a venue like Princess Cruises has allowed Hawaiian cultural practitioners the opportunity to provide hands-on and entertaining cultural experiences to over 3,600 participants on their fleet of ships, said Kara Chow, CNHA Development Officer and Manager of the Hawaiian Way Fund initiative.  “We need more practitioners to participate and partners to expand the program in hotels and local businesses, to malama our living culture.”

CNHA’s Hawaiian Way Fund is a donor giving initiative that supports cultural practitioners and emerging leaders through its Cultural Connections Program and Next Generation Leaders program to create internships and fellowships at Native Hawaiian organizations in community.  For more information, or to donate to the Hawaiian Way Fund, visit www.hawaiianwayfund.org or email at info@hawaiianwayfund.org.

###
Media Contact:

TiLeaf Group

A Native Advocacy Firm

P: 808.529.4610

F: 808.356.3423

E: info@tileafgroup.com

Native Hawaiians over-represented in Hawai‘i’s criminal justice system

Groundbreaking research shows that Native Hawaiians are more likely to be incarcerated than other racial or ethnic groups in Hawai‘i

reportthumb

HONOLULU, HAWAI‘I – The Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) released a new report today, The Disparate Treatment of Native Hawaiians in the Criminal Justice System , which examines the impact of the criminal justice system on Native Hawaiians. While detailing how Native Hawaiians are disproportionately impacted at various stages of Hawai‘i’s criminal justice system, the report also includes first-hand accounts of Native Hawaiian concerns with the criminal justice system and how it affects their families and their culture. Native Hawaiians are the indigenous, native people of Hawai‘i. Findings from the report show that the criminal justice system incarcerates Native Hawaiians at a disproportionate rate.
“This crucial research shows the need to address the unfair treatment of Native Hawaiians in our state’s criminal justice system,” said Clyde Nāmu‘o, OHA’s chief executive officer. “Native Hawaiians make up almost 40 percent of the population in Hawai‘i’s prisons and jails. We are more likely to be sent to prison, and for longer periods of time, than nearly every other racial or ethnic community in Hawai‘i. OHA strongly supports a fair justice system and this study sets the course for change.” Additional key findings in the report include:

  • Of the people serving a prison term in Hawai‘i, approximately 50 percent are housed in facilities on the mainland. Of this population, about 41 percent are Native Hawaiian, the most highly-represented group. While incarcerated out of state, these people are further disconnected from their communities, families and culturally appropriate services for re-entry.
  • Native Hawaiians do not use drugs at drastically different rates from people of other races or ethnicities, but Native Hawaiians go to prison for drug offenses more often than people of other races or ethnicities.
  • Once released from prison, Native Hawaiians experience barriers that prevent them from participating in certain jobs, obtaining a drivers license, voting, continuing education, obtaining housing and keeping a family together.
  • Without a sufficient number of culturally appropriate services, Native Hawaiians are not given the best chance at achieving success upon re-entry into the community.

“In 2009 the OHA Board submitted Concurrent Resolutions to the 25th Legislature noting that a study would be helpful in determining the extent, nature and impact of perceived disparities. The Senate urged with the House of Representatives concurring in HCR27HD1, that OHA should contract a nationally respected and objective consulting firm to conduct a study of disparate treatment of Native Hawaiians in Hawai‘i’s criminal justice system. That study is now complete.” said OHA Chairperson Apoliona.

The resulting report provides a number of recommendations to reduce the unfair impact of the justice system on Native Hawaiians, including:

  • Reform the criminal justice system in Hawai‘i to embrace the cultural values of Native Hawaiians. Changing the justice system so it is in line with culturally significant norms and values will help preserve a historic culture and strengthen the Hawaiian community and its identity.
  • Develop a targeted plan to reduce racial disparities. One immediate proposal by OHA is the establishment of a task force that will review the findings and recommendations of the report, and formulate policies and procedures to eliminate the disparate treatment of Native Hawaiians in the criminal justice system. Members of the task force will include OHA, government agencies, legislators, prosecutors, public defenders, the state attorney general, the judiciary, public safety and probation officials, the police, a former prisoner and treatment providers.
  • Concentrate efforts to reduce the punitive nature of the criminal justice system and fund community-based alternatives to incarceration. Investing in alternatives to incarceration and the investment of funds into re-entry and preventative programs will aid in addressing the disproportionate impact on Native Hawaiians.
  • Reduce collateral consequences associated with criminal justice involvement. The current system deprives pa‘ahao of full integration into the community. Barriers to education, housing, employment and parental rights only serve to increase the likelihood of future re-imprisonment which would further destabilize families and communities.

The Disparate Treatment of Native Hawaiians in the Criminal Justice System was written at the request of the Hawai‘i state legislature following the approval of House Concurrent Resolution 27, and was compiled through research by the Washington, D.C.-based Justice Policy Institute (JPI), and experts at the University of Hawai‘i and Georgetown University.

To read the Executive Summary and the full report of The Disparate Treatment of Native Hawaiians in the Criminal Justice System click here . If you are interested in reading additional research from the Justice Policy Institute on racial disparities and efforts to reduce the number of people affected by the criminal justice system, please visit www.justicepolicy.org .

Contact:
Lloyd YonenakaThis e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Office of Hawaiian Affairs
Office: 808-594-1982
Mobile: 808-754-0078

Justice Policy Institute
Office: 202-558-7974 ext. 306
Mobile: 585-703-7084

Workshop on IRS compliance requirements

These workshops, sponsored by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, is to help small Native Hawaiian serving organizations who are in jeopardy of losing their tax-exempt status meet the IRS compliance requirements by the Oct. 15 deadline.  It is open to representatives of small Native Hawaiian serving organizations (including directors, staff, volunteers or members).  “Small organizations” are those that make less than $25,000 per year.  “Native Hawaiian serving organizations” are organizations that serve Native Hawaiian beneficiaries are part of their programs, projects or mission.  You will be asked to identify the Native Hawaiian community you serve or benefit during the workshop.

Participants are strongly encouraged to bring a laptop computer with wireless internet capability, your organization’s EIN and a working email address in order to complete the IRS filing at the workshop.

If you do not have access to a laptop, please contact us beforehand at honua.consulting@gmail.com.

All workshop dates and locations:

Hawai`i Island (Waimea) 09/25 10:30a & 12:30p

Kanu o ka ‘Aina – Hālau Ho’olako (64-1043 Hiiaka St.)

O`ahu (Honolulu) 10/2 – 10a, 12p & 3p

UH – Manoa Richardson School of Law (2515 Dole St. – CR 2)

Maui (Wailuku) 10/4 – 1p & 5:30p

Maui Ecomomic Opportunity, Inc Family Center (99 Mahalani St.)

You can register for these workshops at:

http://www.eventbrite.com/org/573644599

For more information about the IRS filing requirments or to check to see if your organization may be in jeopardy of losing tax exempt status, please visit http://www.irs.gov/charities/article/0,,id=225705,00.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Kahi of Native Nations Education Foundation at (808) 554-6685.

Additional information will be provided at www.honuaconsulting.com starting September 20, 2010.

Thank you to our partners: Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Native Nations Education Foundation, Honua Consulting, Kanu o ka `Aina Learning `Ohana, Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu, Ka Huli Ao: Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law, Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commer, Hawai`i Maoli and Maui Economic Opportunities, Inc.

Please help spread the word and share this information with others.

Mahalo!
Trisha Kehaulani Watson, JD, PhD
President, Honua Consulting
PO Box 61395
Honolulu, Hawai`i 96839
kelepona (phone): (808) 392-1617
leka uila (email): watson@honuaconsulting.com
kahua punaewele (website): http://www.honuaconsulting.com

Panaewa Hawaiian Home Lands Community Association General Meeting (Quarterly)

Title: Panaewa Hawaiian Home Lands Community Association General Meeting (Quarterly)
Description: General Membership Meeting is held on the 3rd Tuesday of the month (Quarterly- March, June and September)

If you have any questions contact Kelly Lincoln at kelly@hawaiiancommunity.net
Date: 2010-09-21

Hawaii Agriculture Conference

Ag 2010
Hawaii Agriculture Conference
Celebrating Change
Thursday and Friday September 23 & 24, 2010
JW Marriott Resort at Ihilani, Ko‘Olina, Oahu
Special Room Rates Negotiated – $175 (regularly $495)

DONT FORGET TO VOTE, LAST DAY TODAY!

To find your voting poll location CLICK HERE